Posted in Emotion Regulation

Tracing While Deep Breathing

There are so many deep breathing exercises you can do with kiddos.  What works with some might not work with others, so it can be beneficial to provide a kiddo with multiple options so that they can find one that works for them.

The deep breaths are important, but assigning another task while taking deep breaths can also help get the child’s mind off whatever it is they are angry (and possibly ruminating) about.  I’ve shared about TAKE 5 Breathing, but here’s another idea with tracing.

The idea is to have children trace basic geometric shapes, like a triangle, rectangle, or square, while they take deep breaths.  This helps get them fully engaged with the deep breathing and can make it more effective.  Here’s some examples of how to use a square and a star (note with the star, you’d have to trace it twice to get full breaths).

image2image1

 

I usually have kiddos practice a few times with an actual shape in front of them, then have them trace it on a table without a template.  They can also trace it in the air, on their leg, on the wall, etc.

A few times:

  • Practice makes perfect!
  • Remind kiddos to SLOW down – it’s not a race!
Posted in Parenting

Six Tips for Avoiding Negative Behavior (and Tantrums!) at the Grocery Store

Every parent dreads negative behavior and/or tantrums in public places.  It happens (yes, to everyone!), but they can be embarrassing and frustrating.  Grocery stores seem to be “hot spots” for tantrums – maybe because of boredom, lack of attention, and tempting objects in the toy/candy aisles.  Tantrums/meltdowns may not be completely unavoidable, but there are some things you can do that can help prevent them from happening.

  • Pre-teach before heading into the store.  Your rules might be different than other parents, but decide what they are and make them very clear to your kiddos.  While driving to the store, remind children about the expectations for when you are in the store.  Also remind them about any consequences (positive or negative) that might happen.
  • Use PRAISE and REWARDS.  Praise your child often while at the store for sitting still in the cart, walking right next to you, using an inside voice, etc.  Keep a lollipop, sticker, or some other small reward in the car or in your purse.  Have clear expectations for how your child can earn that reward while in the store.  For example, your child might earn a reward if they can use an inside voice.  Or they might earn a reward if they can accept “no” appropriately when asking for something.
  • Get your kiddo involved – think of a way to engage with them while you shop.  Challenge your kiddo to help you find the items on the list.  Have them cross off things on the list as you find them.  Create a guessing game for what aisle items will be in or how long it will take to find something.  This will make the trip more fun (possibly for both of you!) and provide your kiddo with the attention they crave.
  • Keep them occupied.  If getting them involved won’t work, give them something to keep them occupied.  Let them bring a toy to the store or give them a book to read in the cart.  Tablets and phones can be great entertainment, if you’re OK with screen time at the store.  This will help prevent any boredom.
  • PRACTICE!  It might seem silly, but practice truly does increase your kiddos’ chances of success.  Go to the store when you only need a few things and practice appropriate public behavior with your children.  Going when you only need a few items means you can spend more time praising your child while they practice, and means they get to practice for a shorter period of time.
  • Don’t be afraid to leave the store, if needed.  If your child becomes too disruptive or you’ve had enough, but haven’t checked out yet, leave your items with an employee and get out of there.  You can also try taking your child to the car to calm down, then returning for your items once they’re calm.
Posted in Parenting

Seven Positive Affirmations for Moms

Everybody needs some encouragement every once in a while (or sometimes every day!).  Positive affirmations can be very empowering, especially in trying situations.  Below are 7 images with positive affirmations for mothers.  Use the phrases below (or create your own!) as your personal mantra.  Repeat it to yourself, either in your head or out load (been there!) when you need a reminder.

 

I always do my best to meet my child's needs

 

 

I am a capable mother

 

 

 

I am a loving and strong mother

 

 

 

I am a patient mother

 

 

 

I am the best mother I can be

 

 

 

I can handle this

 

 

 

I am the expert on my child Note on this last one: This can be such an empowering statement for a struggling parent.  During therapy sessions, I often tell parents that they are the expert on their children.  I may have a lot of knowledge about behavioral interventions with children, but it’s important to remember that the PARENTS are the experts on their child’s personality, likes, dislikes, motivators, and idiosyncrasies.  You know your child best.

Posted in Parenting

Rewards You Can Use at Home

Rewards are definitely NOT necessary.  Praise, hugs, high-fives, and pats on the back can do wonders when trying to increase positive behaviors.  However, rewards can be really useful in changing behaviors.  One thing I consistently hear from parents is that they don’t want to spend a lot of money on rewards.  Nor should they have to!  There are lots of rewards that parents can use that cost little or no money.  Here are a few ideas:

  • Stickers
  • Let the child pick what the family has for dinner
  • An extra book before bed
  • Staying up 5-10 minutes past bedtime
  • Special bubble bath
  • A small snack (M&Ms, a small cookie, grapes, cereal)
  • One-on-one time with mom or dad (or both!)
  • An extra trip to the park
  • Movie night (at home)
  • Get a pass on a daily chore for one day
  • Video game time or time on the computer (or extra time if they already get some)
  • Camp out in the living room or backyard
  • Game night
  • Let your child help you cook or bake a special treat
  • Bubbles
  • Get a prize box and fill it up with cheap items from the store to let your child pick from
    • Pens/pencils
    • small action figures
    • crazy straws
    • balloons
  • Let your child invite a friend for a sleepover
  • Help mom or dad with a chore or task (chores are boring, but being mom’s special helper can be fun)
  • Dance party in the living room
  • Picnic (indoor or outdoor)
Posted in Uncategorized

Emoti Dolls

I saw a product while watching The Toy Box called Emoti Dolls.  They are plush dolls whose facial features can be changed to show different emotions.  The company website says “One Doll, Infinite Emotions.”

Check out the website for Emotiplush Therapy Dolls.

Looks like a fun doll, but also – what a learning tool!  There are kiddos who struggle to understand emotions and struggle to recognize emotions by facial expressions.  This doll seems like it would be a great tool to practice recognizing emotions in others!

Posted in Therapy

Rewards to Use With Children During Therapy Sessions

I’ve learned that therapy sessions with some children go much, much better when you can offer some sort of incentive.  The trick is to make sure you have specific expectations for earning the prize, not just if a child has “been good.”  The expectation might be no tantrums during the session, that they will answer all questions, or that they will participate in a practice.  Here are some ideas for rewards you can use with children during therapy sessions.

  • I’ve known some therapists who have a “treasure box” or “prize box” for children to pick items out of.  The Dollar Store, Target’s Dollar Spot, or the party favor aisle of the store are great places to get cheap items to offer as rewards.
  • Stickers
  • Computer game for 5-10 minutes at the end of session (Nick Jr. website is a great site for appropriate games for younger children)
  • An APPROPRIATE youtube video (I once worked with a 4-year-old who watched “Let it Go” from Frozen EVERY SINGLE SESSION).
  • A preferred game with you at the end of session

Don’t forget how powerful praise can be.  Most of the time you do not need to offer a reward if you keep the frequency of praise high!

Posted in Parenting

Eight Tips for Helping Siblings Get Along

  1. Use consequences for conflict. You get to decide when a consequence is issued. You may decide it is only for physical aggression, or you may decide that it’s when a child starts yelling. Whatever you decide, the important thing is to be consistent!
  2. … BUT don’t punish everyone for the actions of one. If only one child began yelling or hit their sibling, don’t punish both of them if the other didn’t do anything wrong. This definitely will not foster a good sibling relationship (think of a sales team losing out on an incentive because just ONE employee didn’t meet their goal). Make the consequences individualized.
  3. PRACTICE – give your children opportunities to play together. If they are always in separate rooms and/or playing with separate toys, they won’t have the opportunity to practice sharing and playing cooperatively with others. Note: you may want to sit in the room with them to be able to observe and respond to conflict.  And when they are getting along…
  4. PRAISE, PRAISE, PRAISE – Let your children know they’re doing a good job sharing and playing nicely together. Let them know you’re proud of them and how much you appreciate it. You can even give small rewards if your children REALLY have a tough time just about every time they play together.
  5. Try not to FIX it for them every time – teach them instead! When conflict does happen (and it WILL), don’t just jump in and fix it. Instead, talk to your children about their behavior and talk to them about solutions. Give them the chance to learn how to work through conflict and use those problem-solving skills to come up with a solution. They may not be able to do so every time, but at least walk them through the steps to let them try.
  6. Set terms for taking turns, rather than forcing them to share – if there is a favorite toy, don’t just expect your kids to be able to share it. They may get there eventually, but it doesn’t happen with the snap of a finger. You’ll likely benefit from giving them each a set amount of time with the toy and having them take turns.
  7. Give them ideas for playing together – give them a challenge to work towards together. For example, challenge them to make the longest train track or the highest stack of toy cars. Don’t make it a competition, make it something they can do together (TEAMWORK!).
  8. Set physical boundaries to give them some space, if needed. This tip is for siblings who find it VERY hard to play in the same room. If you feel it’s necessary, set physical boundaries. Place a strip of tape along the center of the playroom or send the children to different rooms. You don’t want to do this all the time (see tip 3), but it can give children some much-needed space to cool down.